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Events - Month View

The event calendar shows upcoming club events. Select a view then use the navigation buttons to move between dates. Click on the event to view more information, including the event description, times, location, fees and any rules regarding attendance; you can also register for events from this screen. Click on the magnifying glass on the toolbar to see search and filter options.


June, 2022

Wednesday
1
Wednesday
1
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The Hays County Commissioners Court proclaims June 2022 as:
HAYS COUNTY MONTH LONG CELEBRATION OF JUNETEENTH
And calls upon the people of Hays County to join together throughout the month of June in honor of this significant date to recognize the importance of Juneteenth to human freedom so cherished by the people of the United States.
Thursday
2
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#OnThisDay in 1924, Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act (also known as the Snyder Act), which granted all Native Americans citizenship and the right to vote regardless of tribal affiliation. As history has shown, having the right to vote does not always equate to having the ability to vote. Learn about hurdles that suppress the Native American vote: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/voting-rights/how-the-native-american-vote-continues-to-be-suppressed/

Resources:

Native American Voting Rights Act (Introduced 2019)

https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1694/text?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22H.+R.+83%22%5D%7D&r=62&s=1

LWV Endorsement of Native American Voting Rights Act

https://www.lwv.org/expanding-voter-access/league-endorses-native-american-voting-rights-act-2019

Voting Rights for Native Americans: https://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/elections/voting-rights-native-americans.html

https://www.coolidgefoundation.org/blog/every-native-american-a-citizen/

Timeline https://immigrationhistory.org/timeline

https://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/elections/voting-rights-native-americans.html
Friday
3
Dunbar Recreation Center
5:00 PM
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Dunbar Heritage Center
Saturday
4
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#OnThisDay in 1919, Congress passed (proposed for ratification) the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. The amendment was ratified by the states on August 18, 1920.

http://www.crusadeforthevote.org/19-amendment

Learn more:

National Women’s History Museum: http://www.crusadeforthevote.org/19-amendment

National Archive: https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/amendments-11-27
Monday
6
8:00 AM
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Watch your email for the monthly Action News!
Thursday
9
Saturday
11
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Today marks the death of Harriet Forten Purvis (1810-1875). Typically, we ask you to join in the celebration of a birth, but Harriet’s birthday is unknown, but her contributions to the rights we enjoy today are worthy of remembrance. Improving the civil and voting rights of others was a family tradition for Harriet and her relatives:

** Daughter of Charlotte Valdine Forten (1st generation suffragist)

** Sister of Sarah Forten Purvis and Margaret Forten (2nd generation suffragists)

** Mother to Hattie Purvis (3rd generation suffragist)

** Aunt of Charlotte Forten Grimke (3rd generation suffragist)

** Wife of Robert Purvis Sr ** (instrumental in development of the Underground Railroad)

Learn more:

-- LOC: https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/more-to-the-movement/harriet-forten-purvis/

-- PBS: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part3/3p477.html

-- Turning Point: https://suffragistmemorial.org/harriet-forten-purvis-1810-1875/

-- Women History: https://www.womenhistoryblog.com/2016/08/harriet-forten-purvis.html
Saturday
11
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Jeannette Pickering Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress.

Learn more:

-- PBS - @unladylike2020: https://unladylike2020.com/profile/jeannette-rankin/

-- House History: https://history.house.gov/People/Listing/R/RANKIN,-Jeannette-(R000055)
Saturday
11
Mary Kyle Hartson City Square Park
9:00 AM
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There will be a special Juneteenth Proclamation and live performances — including the Kyle Twirlers, Fallon Franklin and a special performance by the Houston Ballet‘s first African-American ballerina Sandra Organ Solis — as well as local vendors, arts and crafts, farm to market items and more!
Sunday
12
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Faslane Peace Camp is a permanent peace camp situated next to the Faslane Naval Base in Scotland. Set up on this date in 1982, the camp is the world‘s longest-running active demonstration site and was originally set up as part of the anti-nuclear weapons movements of the 1980s.
Monday
13
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#OnThisDay in 1866, Congress passed (proposed) the 14th Amendment, which granted citizenship to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States,” which included former and recently freed slaves. In addition, it forbids states from denying any person "life, liberty or property, without due process of law" or to "deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

The amendment was passed by Congress (proposed) 0n June 13, 1866 and ratified July 9, 1868.

Resources:
https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/amendments-11-27
Monday
13
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Join us in celebrating the birthday. Miriam was the 1st woman elected as Governor of Texas.

Learn more:
-- https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ffe06
Tuesday
14
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Join us for the second Zoom meeting of the now-forming Texas Rural League Caucus. We welcome anyone with a Texas League who lives in a rural area or whose League service area includes rural communities. At this meeting, we will learn how to Leagues are pursuing multi-county approaches to growing their rural Leagues, and plan for upcoming meetings.
Friday
17
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Monthly on the third Friday, League Presidents are invited to join LWVTX President Grace Chimene for a monthly video chat - always on the third Friday of the month at noon. View details for joining info.
Friday
17
San Marcos Park Plaza
5:00 PM
Friday
17
San Marcos Activity Center
6:00 PM
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Juneteenth Foundation
Saturday
18
LBJ MLK CROSSROADS MEMORIAL
8:30 AM
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Starts at the LBJ Crossroads Memorial and goes to Dunbar Recreation Center at 8:30 AM
Saturday
18
Buda Amphitheater & City Park
10:00 AM
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Free-ish. Family friendly, music, food vendors, vendors. Bring two non-perishable food items to help fill the Hays County Food Bank‘s Food Truck.
Saturday
18
Calaboose African American History Museum
11:00 AM
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The Calaboose African American History museum hosts family events on June 18 from 11:00 AM. to 2:30 PM along with a lecture and book signing by Dr. Daina Ramey Berry. In celebration of Juneteenth, they are also collecting stories, anecdotes, sayings, short memories, and thoughts that relate to what it was like, or is like, to live in the Dunbar neighborhood
Sunday
19
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https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/lkj01
JUNETEENTH. On June 19 ("Juneteenth"), 1865, Union general Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston and issued General Order Number 3, which read, "The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juneteenth
Juneteenth, also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day, is an American holiday that commemorates the June 19, 1865, announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. state of Texas, and more generally the emancipation of enslaved African Americans throughout the former Confederate States of America. Its name is a portmanteau of "June" and "nineteenth", the date of its celebration.[1][2] Juneteenth is recognized as a state holiday or special day of observance in forty-five states.[3]

Today it is observed primarily in local celebrations. Traditions include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional songs such as "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" and "Lift Every Voice and Sing", and reading of works by noted African-American writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou.[4] Celebrations may include rodeos, street fairs, cookouts, family reunions, park parties, historical reenactments, or Miss Juneteenth contests.[5] The Mascogos, descendants of Black Seminoles, of Coahuila, Mexico also celebrate Juneteenth.[6]
Sunday
19
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There will be food, vendors, crafts and activities for both children and adults, and a silent auction. Music for the celebration will be provided by Harmony Gospel and Thee Duo
Wednesday
22
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1970 - Nixon signs 5-yr renewal of VRA

Nixon signs 5-yr renewal of the Voter Rights Act (VRA) on June 22, 1970. The VRA is a landmark federal law enacted in 1965 to remove race-based restrictions on voting.

UPDATE: The VRA was successfully challenged in June 2013 (Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder). The Supreme Court struck down (in a 5-4 ruling) Section 4(b) as outdated and not “grounded in current conditions.” As a consequence, Section 5 is intact, but inoperable, unless or until Congress prescribes a new Section 4 formula.

The #VRA is a landmark federal law enacted in 1965 to remove race-based restrictions on voting.

1965 - Johnson signs VRA

1970 - Nixon signs 5-yr renewal

1975 - Ford signs 7-yr renewal

1982 - Reagan signs 25-yr renewal

2006 - Bush signs 25-yr renewal

2013 - Shelby v. Holder challenges VRA

Learn more: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43626.pdf

Resources:

Johnson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNjlwwf2K9g&feature=youtu.be

Nixon: https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/statement-signing-the-voting-rights-act-amendments-1970

Ford: https://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/library/document/0005/1561605.pdf

Reagan: https://www.reaganlibrary.gov/research/speeches/62982b

Bush: https://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2006/07/20060727.html

Shelby v. Holder: https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/12pdf/12-96_6k47.pdf

VRA Timeline: https://www.aclu.org/voting-rights-act-major-dates-history

Prior challenges: https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/msdelta/ch3.htm

Current status: https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/2018/Minority_Voting_Access_2018.pdf
Thursday
23
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#OnThisDay in 1919, the TX Leg meets in a special session to consider ratification of the 19th Amendment.

The Texas legislature convened in a special session on June 23, 1919. The Texas House adopted a resolution for ratification (by a vote of 96 to 21) on June 24, 1919. Then, the Texas Senate approved the resolution in a viva voce vote on June 28, 1919. #100YearsStrong


Learn more:
-- NPS: https://www.nps.gov/articles/texas-women-s-history.htm#:~:text=On%20June%2028%2C%201919%2C%20the,of%20the%20United%20States%20Constitution
-- TSL: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/lobbyexhibits/struggles-women
-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/viw01
-- Leg Reference Libary: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/govdocs/William%20P%20Hobby/1919/36-2proc.pdf 01
Friday
24
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#OnThisDay in 1919, the Texas House adopts a resolution to ratify the 19th Amendment.

The Texas legislature convened in a special session on June 23, 1919. The Texas House adopted a resolution for ratification (by a vote of 96 to 21) on June 24, 1919. Then, the Texas Senate approved the resolution in a viva voce vote on June 28, 1919.

Learn more:
-- NPS: https://www.nps.gov/articles/texas-women-s-history.htm#:~:text=On%20June%2028%2C%201919%2C%20the,of%20the%20United%20States%20Constitution
-- TSL: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/lobbyexhibits/struggles-women
-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/viw01
Saturday
25
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#OnThisDay in 2013, the Supreme Court of the US (SCOTUS) ruled 5-4 that Section 4(b) of the Voters Right Act (VRA) was unconstitutional because the coverage formula was outdated and not “grounded in current conditions.” As a consequence, Section 5 is intact, but inoperable until Congress agrees on a new Section 4 formula.

The #VRA is a landmark federal law enacted in 1965 to remove race-based restrictions on voting.

Timeline:

1965 - Johnson signs VRA

1970 - Nixon signs 5-yr renewal

1975 - Ford signs 7-yr renewal

1982 - Reagan signs 25-yr renewal

2006 - Bush signs 25-yr renewal

2013 - Shelby v. Holder challenges VRA

Learn more: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43626.pdf

Resources:

Johnson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNjlwwf2K9g&feature=youtu.be

Nixon: https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/statement-signing-the-voting-rights-act-amendments-1970

Ford: https://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/library/document/0005/1561605.pdf

Reagan: https://www.reaganlibrary.gov/research/speeches/62982b

Bush: https://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2006/07/20060727.html

Shelby v. Holder: https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/12pdf/12-96_6k47.pdf

VRA Timeline: https://www.aclu.org/voting-rights-act-major-dates-history

Prior challenges: https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/msdelta/ch3.htm

Current status: https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/2018/Minority_Voting_Access_2018.pdf
Sunday
26
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#OnThisDay in 2015, the US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the right to marry is guaranteed to same-sex couples under the 14th Amendment of the United States Constitution. The product of a three-year court battle challenging state-level bans on same-sex marriage, the landmark decision by the Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges requires all US states to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, while recognising same-sex marriages performed in other jurisdictions, officially making marriage equality the law of the land across the United States and its territories.
Monday
27
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#OnThisDay in 1918, Hortense Sparks Ward became the first woman in Harris County history to register to vote. Born in Matagorda County in 1872, she married Houston lawyer William Henry Ward in 1908. In 1910 she became one of the first women admitted to the Texas state bar (after Edith Locke in 1902 and Alice Tiernan in 1909).

Ward worked tirelessly in support of women’s rights and penned moving newspaper essays and pamphlets for that cause. She was instrumental in the passage of the Married Woman’s Property Law of 1913 by the Texas Legislature, and she campaigned with suffragist Minnie Fisher Cunningham for enfranchisement.

Texas women won an important victory in 1918 when the legislature permitted them to vote in primary elections. In a short span of less than three weeks, 386,000 women across the state registered to vote, and Hortense Ward led the way.

Learn more:
-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fwa83
Monday
27
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#OnThisDay in 1952, Congress passed into law (overriding a veto by Truman) the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1952, which abolished racial restrictions for immigration and naturalization but kept the national origins quota system established in the Immigration act of 1924

Timeline:

1924 - Coolidge signs Johnson-Reed Act: Prevented immigration from Asia, set quotas on the number of immigrants from the Eastern Hemisphere)

1952 - Truman vetoes (veto overridden by Congress) McCarran-Walter Act: Eliminated Asian exclusion and established a preference system that determined which ethnic groups were desirable immigrants

1965 - Johnson signs Hart-Celler Act: Eliminated policy of limiting immigration based on national origin


Learn more: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/immigration-act

Johnson-Reed Act: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1921-1936/immigration-act

McCarran-Walter Act: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/immigration-act

Hart-Celler Act: https://history.house.gov/Historical-Highlights/1951-2000/Immigration-and-Nationality-Act-of-1965/
Tuesday
28
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Join us in commemorating the anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, which became a watershed moment for gay rights. After Stonewall, gay-right groups formed in cities across American, Canada, Australia, and Europe. In June 1970, the first public gay-pride marches took place commemorating the one-year anniversary of the uprising. #PRIDE #CivilRights #Intersectional

Learn more:
--Time: https://buff.ly/35HzdQl
-- PBS: https://buff.ly/2PrCqeP
-- LOC: https://buff.ly/3heGM6w
-- Video of 1st Pride March: https://www.loc.gov/item/mbrs01991430/

Go here to see the LWVTX’s position on Equal Opportunity: https://buff.ly/2NlG5wL

In addition, see the position update report from the 2020 LWVTX convening to see how the League’s positions are evolving. https://buff.ly/2YFYb14
Tuesday
28
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#OnThisDay in 1919, the Texas Senate approved ratification of the 19th Amendment. Texas became the 9th state in the US and the 1st state in the South to approve ratification.

The Texas legislature convened in a special session on June 23, 1919. The Texas House adopted a resolution for ratification (by a vote of 96 to 21) on June 24, 1919. Then, the Texas Senate approved the resolution in a viva voce vote on June 28, 1919. #100YearsStrong


Learn more:
-- NPS: https://www.nps.gov/articles/texas-women-s-history.htm#:~:text=On%20June%2028%2C%201919%2C%20the,of%20the%20United%20States%20Constitution
-- TSL: https://www.tsl.texas.gov/lobbyexhibits/struggles-women
-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/viw01
Tuesday
28
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Monthly on the fourth Tuesday
Hosted by Dorothy Marchand, LWVTX‘s Vice President of Voter Education

This is a monthly meeting of the League’s Voter Services leaders to share challenges confronted by, and solutions and resources available to, our local Leagues.
Tuesday
28
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Join us for the second Zoom meeting of the now-forming Texas Rural League Caucus. We welcome anyone with a Texas League who lives in a rural area or whose League service area includes rural communities. At this meeting, we will learn how to Leagues are pursuing multi-county approaches to growing their rural Leagues, and plan for upcoming meetings.
Wednesday
29
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#OnThisDay, Reagan signs a 25-yr renewal of the Voter Rights Act (VRA) on June 29, 1982. The renewal extended for 25 years the Section 5 preclearance provision and extended the requirement for bilingual elections for 10 years. The VRA is a landmark federal law enacted in 1965 to remove race-based restrictions on voting.

UPDATE: The VRA was successfully challenged in June 2013 (Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder). The Supreme Court struck down (in a 5-4 ruling) Section 4(b) as outdated and not “grounded in current conditions.” As a consequence, Section 5 is intact, but inoperable, unless or until Congress prescribes a new Section 4 formula.

The #VRA is a landmark federal law enacted in 1965 to remove race-based restrictions on voting.

1965 - Johnson signs VRA

1970 - Nixon signs 5-yr renewal

1975 - Ford signs 7-yr renewal

1982 - Reagan signs 25-yr renewal

2006 - Bush signs 25-yr renewal

2013 - Shelby v. Holder challenges VRA

Learn more: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43626.pdf

Resources:

Johnson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNjlwwf2K9g&feature=youtu.be

Nixon: https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/statement-signing-the-voting-rights-act-amendments-1970

Ford: https://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/library/document/0005/1561605.pdf

Reagan: https://www.reaganlibrary.gov/research/speeches/62982b

Bush: https://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2006/07/20060727.html

Shelby v. Holder: https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/12pdf/12-96_6k47.pdf

VRA Timeline: https://www.aclu.org/voting-rights-act-major-dates-history

Prior challenges: https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/msdelta/ch3.htm

Current status: https://www.usccr.gov/pubs/2018/Minority_Voting_Access_2018.pdf
Thursday
30
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The Hays County Commissioners Court proclaims June 2022 as:
HAYS COUNTY MONTH LONG CELEBRATION OF JUNETEENTH
And calls upon the people of Hays County to join together throughout the month of June in honor of this significant date to recognize the importance of Juneteenth to human freedom so cherished by the people of the United States.
Thursday
30